About Us

In Canada, everyone has the right to a safe workplace that provides fair treatment for all - it’s the law. Unfortunately, sexual harassment occurs far too often, and it impacts the health, safety and well-being of those involved. It can even undermine their ability to do their jobs to the best of their ability.

Creating and maintaining “Safer Places” for all individuals in the workplace is a priority of the Government of Canada and the focus of our five-year public education project to address sexual harassment in New Brunswick workplaces. The Project is a collaboration of the Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick (PLEIS-NB) and the New Brunswick Human Rights Commission (NBHRC). It is funded by the Department of Justice Canada.

The Project partners have a long history of promoting access to justice and human rights for everyone. Public Legal Education Information Service of New Brunswick (PLEIS-NB), which is taking a lead role in the Project, is a non-profit charitable organization whose mandate over the past thirty years has been to facilitate access to the justice system by developing plain-language educational resources and services about the law. They are working closely with the New Brunswick Human Rights Commission (NBHRC) which was established in 1967 by the Human Rights Act. The Commission provides citizens with an effective way to address complaints of discrimination, educates the public about this process and, importantly, maintains ongoing awareness of the effects of inequality and the fundamental nature of diversity and inclusivity.

The mandate of this project is to develop tools and resources that are available to employers, employees, legal professionals, and the general public free of charge to help address workplace sexual harassment.

Research findings show that women are most likely to experience sexual harassment, while other vulnerable populations such as the LGBTQ2S community are also at increased risk of being harassed in the workplace and elsewhere.

It is important to create a safe working environment for everyone while paying particular attention to the experiences of workers who might be doubly disadvantaged.

For example, when victimization is based on gender identity or gender expression, it often overlaps with other forms of marginalization based on race, disability, age, social condition, nationality, immigration status, ethnicity, place of origin, and so on. 

This Project recognizes the importance of identifying such intersectionality and addressing harassment in a holistic, collaborative and trauma-informed fashion.

Getting Started

Listening to the Voices of Vulnerable Employees

Research findings show that women are most likely to experience sexual harassment, while other vulnerable populations such as the LGBTQ2S community are also at risk of being harassed in the workplace and elsewhere.

We are pleased to share the findings of the Consultation Report with you.
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